Shark Attack Deathmatch 2

Shark Attack Deathmatch 2 Review

One of Steam’s Early Access Games

It can be a bit of risk getting involved with Steam’s Early Access games. Though the play-as-the-game-gets-developed sentiment can lead to titles harvesting a decent fan-base in their infancy, it can also cause annoyance due to the relative lack of features/game modes/content in the early stages.

One of the games that could have gone either way is Shark Attack Deathmatch 2. A sequel to the original underwater-set shark-shooter spectacular, Deathmatch 2 is one of the Early Access games that managed to intrigue players from the outset. With customisation options not even available in Depth (its main competitor) as well as some fairly solid underwater deathmatch action, Shark Attack Deathmatch 2 is on the medium to upper end of the “intense” scale of the games reviewed on this site.

Gameplay

Shark Attack Deathmatch 2’s gameplay is somewhat comparable to that of what should be considered this game’s main rival: Depth. This is a classic first-person gameplay format through and through, with the underwater environment viewed exclusively through the diver’s eyes; only your current weapon is seen centred on the X axis at the bottom of the screen. You use the mouse to aim of course, and the left mouse button to shoot. You also use said button to swipe your knife, which is part of your barebones arsenal that you can fall back on should you run out of ammo or be unfortunate enough to have a gun with poor reload time.

What does make this game stand out against Depth is the fact that you’re not only defending yourself against sharks but also fellow divers that are also on the server. This means there are more threats to consider when you’re swimming around in the water, increasing the tension a little because you’re dealing with large and powerful sharks as well as small, agile humans that can attack you with projectile weapons from afar.

As is the trade-off with all Steam’s Early Access games, you’re not getting the finished product and the same applies here: the diver-perspective gameplay is only half of the fun. Coming soon to Shark Attack Deathmatch is the much-anticipated Predator mode, which will allow players to assume the role of the shark as you attempt to even the score by killing divers instead. The lack of this mode from the outset is one of the most disappointing things about this game because it basically halves the potential intensity of the gameplay before you’ve even begun. Also, Depth has the shark-perspective element of gameplay in its framework as standard, so there’s no way that Shark Attack Deathmatch 2 could possibly occupy the same metaphorical waters as its rival as it currently stands.

Content

In its current state, Shark Attack Deathmatch 2 teases you with a list of modes, only many of them are forthcoming and cannot yet be selected. Predator Mode is provisional of course, as are Team Deathmatch, Capture the Flag. If you’re lucky enough to find enough players online to enter into matches with/against, you can currently enjoy Deathmatch or Survival Co-Op modes, but that’s pretty much it when it comes to this game’s various spins on the same FPS-style gameplay.

There are customisation options available which add a little to the fun, but these involve simply changing the colour and appearance of your diver character using various sliders and colour swatches. When you compare this with Depth, which has just had its latest (one of many) content updates in the form of Depth: Fresh Blood, you’re talking about a comparative skeleton to Depth’s meaty carcass of content.

Conclusion

As it stands, Shark Attack Deathmatch 2 doesn’t quite cut the mustard when you compare it to Depth. There are various problems that plague this game in its current state, which include a distinct lack of gameplay modes, very few players on the servers, and a fairly basic and unimaginative execution of the underwater first-person shooter genre.

The main issue was that having played Depth – a game of almost unimaginable tension that is created and maintained with a clever combination of high-quality sound effects, intelligent map design, and graphics that truly reflect the claustrophobic nature of the murky depths of the ocean floor – this game struggles to compete against it. Though the underwater graphics look great, the scenery itself is rather bland and the environments too well-lit to create any sense of mystery or instil the fear of the unknown in the way that Depth manages with ease. It may be worth waiting for the game’s full roster of features to become available, but its lack of maps, game modes, players, tension, and distinguishing features make this one of the lower-intensity shark attack games here www.sharkattackgames.net, that are on the market right now.  

Content

In its current state, Shark Attack Deathmatch 2 teases you with a list of modes, only many of them are forthcoming and cannot yet be selected. Predator Mode is provisional of course, as are Team Deathmatch, Capture the Flag. If you’re lucky enough to find enough players online to enter into matches with/against, you can currently enjoy Deathmatch or Survival Co-Op modes, but that’s pretty much it when it comes to this game’s various spins on the same FPS-style gameplay.

There are customisation options available which add a little to the fun, but these involve simply changing the colour and appearance of your diver character using various sliders and colour swatches. When you compare this with Depth, which has just had its latest (one of many) content updates in the form of Depth: Fresh Blood, you’re talking about a comparative skeleton to Depth’s meaty carcass of content.

Conclusion

As it stands, Shark Attack Deathmatch 2 doesn’t quite cut the mustard when you compare it to Depth. There are various problems that plague this game in its current state, which include a distinct lack of gameplay modes, very few players on the servers, and a fairly basic and unimaginative execution of the underwater first-person shooter genre.

The main issue was that having played Depth – a game of almost unimaginable tension that is created and maintained with a clever combination of high-quality sound effects, intelligent map design, and graphics that truly reflect the claustrophobic nature of the murky depths of the ocean floor – this game struggles to compete against it. Though the underwater graphics look great, the scenery itself is rather bland and the environments too well-lit to create any sense of mystery or instil the fear of the unknown in the way that Depth manages with ease. It may be worth waiting for the game’s full roster of features to become available, but its lack of maps, game modes, players, tension, and distinguishing features make this one of the lower-intensity shark attack games here that are on the market right now.